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Spotlight: Hamish Mackenzie, Operations Engineer at Baker Hughes




Tell us a fun fact about yourself


I’ve got 2 ducks and a dog (who get on great). You can’t beat fresh duck eggs on a Sunday morning!


Tell us about your career journey so far


Finishing my degree in Mechanical Engineering, I started as an intern at Baker Hughes, Well Intervention. I worked as a Field Engineer for 3 years on a variety of projects over the whole business process from initial customer inquiry, planning and executing the job then invoicing it. I spent a year as a Technical Sales Engineer leading projects before starting my current role managing completion operations.


What was your favourite subject in school and why?


Physics. I’ve always been interested in ‘how stuff works’. It was full of interesting ideas with practical applications. While being amazed by physics, I think it was one of the few subjects I found to have immediately apparent uses in the world after school which made it all more interesting.


What subjects/qualifications are useful in your role?


Of the subjects I studied at school the most useful are; Physics, Chemistry, Maths and Graphic Communication.


I have a BEng (Hons) in Mechanical Engineering and I’m currently studying an MSc in Drilling and Well Engineering at the Robert Gordon University. Both have enhanced my understanding of subjects required for my day to day role.



What is your favourite thing about your job?


Every day is different. Whether it’s working with colleagues in the office, workshop or offshore, my wide remit means I’m never bored!


What is a normal day in your role like?


Fortunately, no such thing exists. The end goal of delivering solutions for customers is the same but how that happens ranges from office, workshop and offshore applications depending on what stage an operation is at.


Suggest an activity that could be done at home that illustrates an aspect of your work?


Consider the ‘Iron triangle’ – it’s a Project Management constraint considering Time, Cost and Quality.


For example; if I’m looking for a shed in my garden, the quickest thing to do would be to buy one. That will of course be expensive and I can’t best shape it to my garden or my preferred use so I lose out on quality too. I could build it myself with cost or quality in mind but likely not both. Note that wouldn’t be the quickest option!


I have to make considerations with these constraints in mind on a daily basis and they’re worth considering.


Can you think of any examples where you must balance these considerations?








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Tel: 01383 626070

Email: sae@sserc.scot

Address: 2 Pitreavie Court, Dunfermline, KY11 8UU

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The UK-wide STEM Ambassador programme is managed by STEM Learning Limited, which operates the National STEM Learning Network, alongside other projects supporting STEM education. To find out more please go to the STEM Learning website